Why Bounce?

We’ll explain!

Physical Benefits – “Let’s get physical”

  • Improved posture and body alignment.
  • 40% less impact on your joints and muscles.
  • Core-stability muscles are constantly engaged in order to keep you stable and balanced on the mini rebounder (trampoline).
  • Rebound exercise can help increase your body’s metabolic rate and its ability to burn calories more efficiently, helping your body to process nutrients more efficiently.
  • Saves you time (10 minutes of rebounding is as effective as 30 minutes of running).
  • Gives all the benefits of aerobic exercises without jarring the skeletal system.
  • “Most of all, bouncing on a rebounder is just FUN!”

Mental Benefits – “It’s all in your head”

  • Stress relief – combat depression, anxiety, and stress by increasing the amount of endorphins released to the brain.
  • Rebounder workouts increase the circulation of oxygen throughout the body, with regulating sleep patterns.
  • Exercising on a trampoline increases the circulation of oxygen around your body, making you more alert and improving mental performance.
  • Strengthens every cell, muscle, organ, tissue, bone and tendon in the body.
  • Rebounder workouts will make you feel happier, more positive, and even more self-confident.
  • “It’s hard to feel blue when you’re bouncing.”

The Lymphatic System: Step-by-Step

  • Definition: basically your body’s natural way of detoxing.
  • At the bottom of the bounce, poisons, toxins and waste products are being squeezed out from between the cells.
  • As the body bounds into the air, waste is loosened from the cell, and nutrients are passed from lymph (fluid) to the cells.
  • At the height of the bounce, the body is weightless. Valves are open … Fluid begins to flow.
  • As the body descends, fluid flows, sucking waste products out and away from the cells to be eliminated by the lymph fluid.

Class TypesSee Schedule

 

References

  1. Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation, 1990: 10; 401-4082.
  2. The Miracles of Rebound Exercise; Carter, Albert E.; The National institute of Reboundology and Health, Inc. Edmonds, Washington, 1979.
  3. Journal of Applied Physiology 49(5): 881-887, 1980, which confirms many of the statements previously made in The Miracles of Rebound Exercise, 1979. The research was performed by the Biomechanical Research Division, NASA-Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California, in cooperation with the Wenner-Gren Research laboratory, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky.
  4. Journal of Applied Physiology 49(5): 881-887, 1980, which confirms many of the statements previously made in The Miracles of Rebound Exercise, 1979. The research was performed by the Biomechanical Research Division, NASA-Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California, in cooperation with the Wenner-Gren Research laboratory, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky.
  5. National Osteoporosis Foundation, www.nof.org